Having a Corona fright

In this episode, Maria Cazacu interviewed a young Austrian nurse who commutes across the border to Germany every day. In this episode, Melone gives us an insight into how it is to work with corona patients every day and come home from work not knowing whether she has the virus and potentially infecting her family.

The day I hated my job..

Nowadays, all the newspapers, Tv channels and radio programs are talking about coronavirus. In a world in stand still, it’s not easy not to fall into the vicious circle of fear and panic. And the media has a responsibility in this…

No, the corona lockdown is not heaven for introverts

Social media posts, memes, columns and articles suggest that introverts are thriving during the current corona lockdown. And whilst we do enjoy our own company and staying at home, we want our old lives back just like the extroverts. I even said it myself. ‘’As an introvert, I am absolutely fine with being at home all the time during this lockdown’’. To some extent, I am right. I am okay. I don’t need advice from a comedian on Instagram on how to stay sane – some would argue that it would be too late anyway. I don’t need new hobbies to keep me entertained. And I don’t badly need the company of other people.

People did not go up the hill

My mother told me a story dozens of times before I went to bed. In the story, there was a shepherd, who once went up the hill, to warn that a wolf was coming. When the villagers came up, they saw that it was all the shepherd’s joke. The shepherd repeated the joke four more times, until the wolf really came. On that occasion, the villagers were already fed up, and that time they did not come to help the sheppard. Now, I realize this child story could be translated to the current situation. I changed the village for society, the shepherd for the traditional media, and the wolf for the Coronavirus, and the result is both surprising and effective. Something as simple as a child story could be used to understand how the media have worked in health issues.

Enter the chat

“Relax! This is just a Flu. Plus, it only affects old people. We are fine,” my flatmate harshly said to me. In the first week of the corona outbreak in Denmark, she spent days going in and out of our dorm to parties. She would come home after two or three days, cook whatever she found in our kitchen, watch TV in the common room and go out again. With the news showing how dangerous this could be, I decided to ask her to be more careful. I explained to her that she needs to be responsible, since she lives in student housing and shares some spaces with ten other people. She did not care. There was no reason for her to stop enjoying the “break” she miraculously got, she told me, and who was I to say otherwise?

The feeling of being powerful

Since we are locked inside 24 hours a day, it’s normal to want to do something during this crisis we are facing. Giving your blood is one of the easiest things you can do. Behind the work at the donation centers, reality often catches up with us. I was barely 21. And, celebrating your birthday under coronavirus times was definitely not something that I would recommend. The birthday wishes were as varied as “Good luck in this difficult time”, “Do you know someone who has corona?”,“Is your family okay?”. I was a French student in Denmark, and I was feeling useless. I was pretty sure that I wasn’t the only one having this feeling. Between the four walls of my bedroom, I was going nuts. While I was watching the news, hearing about the doctors, teachers, cashiers, farmers helping in many ways to help our countries, I realized that me, a 21 years-old girl, with both my legs and arms, I could also act. Being powerful.

Following the numbers

From Aarhus, Denmark, I saw from a distance as a foreigner living abroad how the infections and deaths from COVID-19 rapidly accumulated in the Netherlands. When I returned home and was in the middle of it, the numbers stopped for me.