No, the corona lockdown is not heaven for introverts

Social media posts, memes, columns and articles suggest that introverts are thriving during the current corona lockdown. And whilst we do enjoy our own company and staying at home, we want our old lives back just like the extroverts. I even said it myself. ‘’As an introvert, I am absolutely fine with being at home all the time during this lockdown’’. To some extent, I am right. I am okay. I don’t need advice from a comedian on Instagram on how to stay sane – some would argue that it would be too late anyway. I don’t need new hobbies to keep me entertained. And I don’t badly need the company of other people.

Enter the chat

“Relax! This is just a Flu. Plus, it only affects old people. We are fine,” my flatmate harshly said to me. In the first week of the corona outbreak in Denmark, she spent days going in and out of our dorm to parties. She would come home after two or three days, cook whatever she found in our kitchen, watch TV in the common room and go out again. With the news showing how dangerous this could be, I decided to ask her to be more careful. I explained to her that she needs to be responsible, since she lives in student housing and shares some spaces with ten other people. She did not care. There was no reason for her to stop enjoying the “break” she miraculously got, she told me, and who was I to say otherwise?

A complete lockdown the French way

This is it. We are on complete lockdown. After our Italian neighbour, this is France’s turn to go into isolation to limit the spread of the current pandemic. When our president Emmanuel Macron announced on the evening TV news, in a speech, that France was going on full lockdown for two weeks, the French didn’t imagine what life would be like during this period of time. It is not just about confinement or self-isolation in this case. This a matter of not having a legal right to go out, except with a good reason to do so and an official form to fill in -with limited options. And France has a way of reacting to issues that is very different from the rest of Europe.

The challenge of continuing education during this lockdown-situation

During these times when COVID-19 has spread across the world, people’s lives are being affected by the measures taken to control the spread of the virus and prevent more deaths. I am making the best out of the current situation staying at my dorm and keeping myself active by biking in the hills, cooking tasty dishes and hanging out with my roommates. I try to do the best I can to continue my exchange-program here in Denmark through online means. This lockdown-situation disturbs the daily activities of most people and is causing great uncertainty for many. Staff working and students studying at schools and universities are facing challenges because people are not able to meet physically.